Monday, February 17, 2014
slaughterhouse90210:

“The past is whatever the records and the memories agree upon.”  ― George Orwell, 1984

slaughterhouse90210:

“The past is whatever the records and the memories agree upon.”
― George Orwell, 1984

Wednesday, February 12, 2014
Monday, February 10, 2014
comedycentral:

This new Key & Peele video with Liam Neesons is my jam tho.

comedycentral:

This new Key & Peele video with Liam Neesons is my jam tho.

Saturday, February 8, 2014
philamuseum:

Cheers to John Ruskin, the British artist, art critic, and author born on this day in 1819! Ruskin championed the depiction of nature in art and favored contemporaries such as J. M. W. Turner over the old masters. “It is written on the arched sky; it looks out from every star,” he wrote. “It is the poetry of Nature; it is that which uplifts the spirit within us.” “Beanstalk”, date unknown, by John Ruskin

philamuseum:

Cheers to John Ruskin, the British artist, art critic, and author born on this day in 1819! Ruskin championed the depiction of nature in art and favored contemporaries such as J. M. W. Turner over the old masters. “It is written on the arched sky; it looks out from every star,” he wrote. “It is the poetry of Nature; it is that which uplifts the spirit within us.”

Beanstalk”, date unknown, by John Ruskin

Sunday, February 2, 2014
Whatever causes night in our souls may leave stars. Victor Hugo, Ninety-Three (via aestheticintrovert)

(Source: betoseem)

Thursday, January 16, 2014
cavetocanvas:

Miriam Schapiro, Agony in the Garden, 1991
From the Brooklyn Museum:

This large-scale painting is one in an ongoing Collaboration series begun in the mid-1970s, in which Schapiro dialogues with and pays homage to famous women artists, in this instance Frida Kahlo, whose self-portrait The Broken Column, 1944, is reproduced in the center. Schapiro is a pioneering feminist artist who, with Judy Chicago, founded the Feminist Art Program at the California Institute of the Arts in 1971, the first program of its kind to encourage women to make art from their personal experiences. A leader in the Pattern and Decoration movement, Schapiro is known for her “femmages,” or collage paintings, which aim to reclaim traditional handicrafts associated with women’s work, such as embroidery and sewing. Stylistically this painting mimics the look of a collage, recalling Schapiro’s long-standing commitment to the belief that decorative elements and women’s work are viable artistic means to express female experience, having both political and subversive potential.

cavetocanvas:

Miriam Schapiro, Agony in the Garden, 1991

From the Brooklyn Museum:

This large-scale painting is one in an ongoing Collaboration series begun in the mid-1970s, in which Schapiro dialogues with and pays homage to famous women artists, in this instance Frida Kahlo, whose self-portrait The Broken Column, 1944, is reproduced in the center. Schapiro is a pioneering feminist artist who, with Judy Chicago, founded the Feminist Art Program at the California Institute of the Arts in 1971, the first program of its kind to encourage women to make art from their personal experiences. A leader in the Pattern and Decoration movement, Schapiro is known for her “femmages,” or collage paintings, which aim to reclaim traditional handicrafts associated with women’s work, such as embroidery and sewing. Stylistically this painting mimics the look of a collage, recalling Schapiro’s long-standing commitment to the belief that decorative elements and women’s work are viable artistic means to express female experience, having both political and subversive potential.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 Tuesday, January 7, 2014

slowartday:

Kehinde Wiley

As a contemporary descendent of a long line of portraitists—including Reynolds, Gainsborough, Titian, Ingres, and others—Wiley engages the signs and visual rhetoric of the heroic, powerful, majestic, and sublime in his representation of urban black and brown men found throughout the world.

By applying the visual vocabulary and conventions of glorification, wealth, prestige, and history to subject matter drawn from the urban fabric, Wiley makes his subjects and their stylistic references juxtaposed inversions of each other, forcing ambiguity and provocative perplexity to pervade his imagery. Wiley’s larger-than-life figures disturb and interrupt tropes of portrait painting, often blurring the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation and the critical portrayal of masculinity and physicality as it pertains to the view of black and brown young men. (via)
Sunday, December 29, 2013

(Source: e-bae)